Bay Port Elevator
            
     Another landmark of Bay Port was the
   Elevator owned by Wallace and Morley Co.
it was one of 16 in Michigan owned by the corp.
Their motto had been " It takes good seed to grow
good crops."    

                                                                                         

 

The Grand Hotel

 

 

 


"Lavatories, tables, dresser and bureau tops all
 made of marble..." That sounds like a fashionable
hotel in France. But no, it was the description of
the Bay Port Hotel in the years 1886-1907.
What small town in the state can boast a 117 room
attraction with casino, bowling, sailing, pool tables
and electric lighting in its historic past? The well-to-do
tourists came by train from the big city and were brought
from the depot by carriage to the hotel. It was first-class
all the way and it happened in a little town called Bay Port.

 

                                                                                

 

The Train Depot

 

 

The Bay Port train depot was once a popular,
busy place. Now there is only an empty spot and a
memory of time past when the whistle blew and
Bay Port became alive with excitement as tourists,
travelers, mail and all sorts of merchandise came to town.

 

 

 

Main Street

 

 

 


 A scene of a parade in 1935 pm the east and west
 street in Bay Port. Starting from the east, Meyer's
 Grocery Store, Meyer's Restaurant, Dast
 Barbershop and Lee's Meat Market.
 In 1948 Mr. Lee was 84 years old, but said
 he  was too young to retire. He worked 44 years
 in his meat market selling quality meat and was
 quoted as saying he "didn't believe that mere age
 is reason enough for retirement if a man likes his
 job."

 

Wallace & Morley
This is a photo of the second Company Store. The
first building was destroyed by fire in 1920. The
above structure was erected in 1923, but was also
destroyed by fire in the 1950's. The two-story brick
building housed the Bay Port General Store and the
offices of the Wallace & Morley Company. The
Post Office, adjoining to the north, had also been destroyed.
The new building built in its place contained both the
Wallace & Morley offices and the new Post Office. The
Bay Port State Bank now occupies the premises of the
Wallace & Morley Company.